BoA is hiring someone in Hong Kong to monitor “threat” from its own staff

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As banks across Asia bulk up their cyber security teams, Bank of America’s Hong Kong office is recruiting for a cyber role with a difference: it’s focused on the threat posed by other employees at the firm. The cyber security operations team at BoA is looking to recruit a human threat prevention security engineer, responsible for “conducting data analysis of insider threat auditing and monitoring software resources to detect and identify insider risk activities”, according to the bank’s careers site.

Insider threat professionals mainly focus on malicious threats – including fraud, information theft and IT-network sabotage – to banks from staff who hold inside information about security practices, data and computer systems. Jobs in the field are typically hard to fill because the work is often “stressful due to the internal-snooping aspect”, says a Hong Kong-based technology recruiter.

BoA’s job description bears this out. The successful candidate will manage “high risk regional information security incidents”, conduct investigations, and interview “persons of interest” at the bank. They will also be “comfortable working with incomplete facts”.

The tech involved, however, should make the BoA role appealing, says the recruiter. BoA’s cyber unit uses “next generation tools and technology to conduct deep behavioural analytics assessments”.

Insider threat jobs have expanded in number at banks in Hong Kong and Singapore over the past two years as part of a wider recruitment drive within the cyber security function which has triggered a string of senior appointments, says the recruiter.

As we reported last week, for example, OCBC has named Edwin Teo as its new head of technology risk management. Earlier this year, Anthony Fung joined OCBC’s technology information security office as head of group red team (the unit that hacks the bank’s tech systems to test vulnerabilities) after previously working for Standard Chartered. And UOB has recently hired Tobias Gondrom as chief information security officer following his three-year stint as chief technology officer for security at telecoms company Huawei.

Security jobs are becoming more in demand as banks in Asia tackle the growing threat of cyber attacks and seek to comply with increasingly vigorous local regulations, such as Singapore’s Cybersecurity Act, which became law in February. Skill shortages are also fuelling senior hiring as banks rush to replace senior team members after they are poached by competitors, say recruiters.

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Image credit: majaiva, Getty

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